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3 edition of The Biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants found in the catalog.

The Biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants

The Biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants

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  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in San Diego .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Frankia.,
  • Actinorhizal plants.,
  • Actinorhizas.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    Statement[edited by] Christa R. Schwintzer and John D. Tjepkema.
    ContributionsSchwintzer, Christa R., Tjepkema, John D.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQR82.F7 B56 1990
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 408 p. :
    Number of Pages408
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2198637M
    ISBN 10012633210X
    LC Control Number89018425

    xing bacteria Frankia with these actinorhizal plants can mitigate the adverse e ects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Inoculation of actinorhizal plants with Frankia signi cantly improves plant growth, biomass, shoot and root N content, and survival rate a er transplanting in elds. Alnus maritima subsp. maritima is a rare shrub that is unique among alders in its restriction to waterlogged soils. An actinorhizal species with great horticultural potential, this plant develops a root-nodule symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Frankia. Oxygen in the root zone is critical to establishment of an effective symbiosis, and both symbiotic partners are challenged by Cited by: 1.


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The Biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants Download PDF EPUB FB2

The book begins with overviews of Frankia and the actinorhizal plants, and developments in the field prior to the first confirmed isolation of Frankia. Next is a series of authoritative chapters on the biology of Frankia, the symbiosis, and actinorhizal plants. The book begins with overviews of Frankia and the actinorhizal plants, and developments in the field prior to the first confirmed isolation of Frankia.

Next is a series of authoritative chapters on the biology of Frankia, the symbiosis, and actinorhizal Edition: 1. The Biology of Frankia and Actinorhizal Plants Paperback – by Christa R. Schwintzer (Editor) See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Kindle "Please retry" $ Format: Paperback. Biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants. San Diego: Academic Press, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Christa R Schwintzer; John D Tjepkema.

Biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants. San Diego: Academic Press, © (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File: All Authors / Contributors: Christa R Schwintzer; John D Tjepkema.

During the infection of actinorhizal plants by Frankia, the bacteria comes in close contact with the plant cell. This interface between the two symbiotic partners is an.

: Frankia and Actinorhizal Plants (Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences) (Volume 18) (): M. Lalonde, C. Camiré, J.O. Dawson: Books. Frankia sp. strains are filamentous bacteria that convert atmospheric N 2 gas into ammonia.

This process is known as nitrogen fixation. Frankia fix nitrogen while living in root nodules on “actinorhizal plants”.Frankia thus can supply most or all of the host plants' nitrogen needs. Consequently, actinorhizal plants colonize and often thrive in soils that are low in combined nitrogen.

Katharina Pawlowski, Birgitta Bergman, in Biology of the Nitrogen Cycle, Actinorhizal microsymbionts. Frankia comprises Gram-positive and Gram-variable actinomycetes that grow in hyphal form.

Like cyanobacteria and in contrast to most rhizobia, Frankia strains can also fix N 2 in the free-living state. Under fixed-N limitation and aerobic conditions, Frankia strains form special. Frankia. Frankia is a gram-positive nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium that forms a symbiotic association with actinorhizal is a filamentous free-living bacterium [] found in root nodules or in soil [].The genus Frankia has been classified in the order of Actinomycetales on the basis of morphology, cell chemistry, and 16S rRNA sequences [].Cited by: Nitrogen-Fixing Systems.

(Book Reviews: The Biology of Frankia and Actinorhizal Plants.). In: Schwintzer CR, Tjepkema JD (eds) The biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants. Academic Press, San Diego, pp – CrossRef Google Scholar Schwintzer CR, Berry AM, Disney LD () Seasonal patterns of root nodule growth, endophyte morphology, nitrogenase activity and shoot development in Myrica by: 3.

Some actinorhizal plants can be used as sources of biomass for generating energy or for carbon storage; some have been used for remediating stressed or contaminated soils. The recent availability of three Frankia genomes may help clarify the evolution of prokaryote/plant symbioses, environmental and geographical adaptation, metabolic diversity.

Abstract. The actinorhizal symbioses are mutualistic relationships between the actinomycete genus Frankia and a number of dicotyledonous plant genera belonging to eight diverse plant families.

Root nodules of actinorhizal plants induced by Frankia are morphologically distinct from legume nodules which are formed by a is relatively conservative in its interaction with its host Cited by: 1.

Abstract. Frankia populations were analyzed in three soils devoid of actinorhizal plants but containing monocultures of birch (Betula pendula Roth), pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) or spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten). Bioassays using seedlings of Alnus incana as capture plants resulted in nodulation capacities of ±7, ±13, and ±6 nodulation units g −1 of these soils, by: The soil bacterium Frankia of the Actinomycetales, capable of forming N{sub 2}-fixing symbiotic root nodules on a diverse array of actinorhizal plants, has several morphological forms when grown.

The symbiosis between actinorhizal plants and Frankia induces the formation of a perennial root organ called nodule, wherein bacteria is hosted and nitrogen is fixed [25, 26].In the field, actinorhizal nodule can have variable forms and colours [].Comparison of actinorhizal and leguminous nodules shows that morphology, anatomy, origin, and functioning of nodules are different for these two Cited by:   1 Introduction.

Members of the actinomycetous genus Frankia are generally characterized as nitrogen-fixing organisms that form root nodules in symbiosis with more than species of non-leguminous woody plants in 25 genera of angiosperms [].

Frankia populations inhabit two distinct ecological niches, the root nodule and the soil. Studies on Frankia populations in both niches, Cited by:   Plants from the Casuarinaceae family enter symbiosis with the actinomycete Frankia leading to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules.

We observed that application of the auxin influx inhibitor 1-naphtoxyacetic acid perturbs actinorhizal nodule formation. This suggests a potential role for auxin influx carriers in the infection process.

More than species of dicotyledonous plants belonging to eight different families and 24 genera can establish actinorhizal symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing soil actinomycete Frankia.

Compared to the symbiotic interaction between legumes and rhizobia, little is known about the molecular basis of the infection process and nodule formation in actinorhizal by: 7. Frankia populations were analyzed in three soils devoid of actinorhizal plants but containing monocultures of birch (Betula pendula Roth), pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) or spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karsten).

Actinorhizal plants are defined by their ability to form N 2-fixing root nodule symbioses with actinomycetes from the genus Frankia ().The symbiosis uncouples the plants from a need for soil nitrogen.

As a result, the plants and their infective symbionts have radiated into a remarkable variety of niches that include dry tropical soils, temperate wetlands, northern forests, sand dunes Cited by: Goals / Objectives The overall goal of this proposal is the identification and characterization of the Frankia signaling molecule involved in the early signaling events in the actinorhizal symbiosis between actinorhizal plants and the bacterial partner.

Analysis of sequenced Frankia genomes has provided a myriad of information on these bacteria and several surprises including the absence of. Reviews The Biology of Frankia atid Actinorhizal Plants. by CHRIST.^ R. SCHWINTZER and JOHN D. TjEPKEMA. X tnm.

xviii with 48 text-figures and 22 tables. San Diego: Aca-demic Press. Price S ISBN 0 12 OX. sis between the actinomycete genus Frankia and a heterogeneous group of dicotyledenous genera has. MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF ACTINORHIZAL SYMBIOSES 1.

INTRODUCTION Two nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses between soil bacteria and plants have been described, one between Rhizobium and legumes and the other between Frankia and actinorhizal plants.

The Rhizobium/legume symbiosis involves more than   N2-fixing symbiotic root nodules of the actinorhizal host Datisca glomerata express Dgrca (D. g lomerata Rubisco activase) mRNA, a transcript usually associated with photosynthetic organs or tissues.

In northern blots a mature, nucleotide Dgrca mRNA was detected in green plant organs (leaves, flowers, and developing fruits) and in nodules but was not detected in by:   Biological nitrogen fixation is an alternative to nitrogen fertilizer. It is carried out by prokaryotes using an enzyme complex called nitrogenase and results in atmospheric N2 being reduced into a form of nitrogen diazotrophic organisms and plants are able to use (ammonia).

Impacts 1-An increased understanding how the actinorhizal symbiosis influences the global distribution of these plants and their wide range of habitats could be extended to other plants systems 2-Identification and validation of Frankia biosynthetic clusters for novel natural products that may have potential biotechnological uses 3-Comparative.

actinorhizal plants and nitrogen-fixing legumes, focusing on the unusual features of actinorhizal symbioses. Recognizing actinorhizal taxa with commercial potential is important, in part, because of their prevalence. There appear to be more temperate, actinorhizal species with horticultural importance or promise than there are temperate woody.

Benson DR, Silvester WB () Biology of Frankia strains, actinomycete symbionts of actinorhizal plants. Microbiological Revi – Berry AM, McIntyre L, McCully ME () Fine structure of root hair infection leading to nodulation in the Frankia–Alnus by:   Actinorhizal plants belong to eight angiosperm families that can form symbioses with a filamentous soil bacterium called Frankia.

Despite their ecological importance and recent advances in knowledge, the molecular bases of the formation and functioning of actinorhizal symbioses are still poorly understood [ 1 ]-[ 4 ].Cited by: Actinorhizal plants are a specific group of non-leguminous, woody dicots having symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing root nodules that are induced on roots of actinorhizal plant species by soil actinomycetes of the genus Frankia.

There is a lack of basic information on actinorhizal plants in Africa compared with other major land masses in the by: Baker, D.

Methods for the isolation, culture and characterization of the Frankiaceae: Soil actinomycetes and symbionts of actinorhizal plants. In H. Labeda (Ed.), Isolation of biotechnological organisms from nature (pp.

New York, USA: McGraw Hill, Inc. Google ScholarCited by: Frankia Symbiosis by P. Normand,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Record number: Title: Boekbespreking: The biology of Frankia and actinorhizal plants, J.D.

Tjepkema, C.R. Schwintzer (eds.). Author(s) Akkermans, A.D.L. Some plants can fix atmospheric nitrogen by hosting symbiotic diazotrophic rhizobia or Frankia bacteria in root organs, known as nodules.

Such nodule symbiosis occurs in ten lineages in four taxonomic orders; Fabales, Fagales, Cucurbitales and Rosales, which collectively are known as the nitrogen-fixing clade (NFC).

Based on differences in ontogeny and histology, nodules have been divided into. 1. Importance of Actinorhizal Plants 2. Occurrence and Distribution of Actinorhizal Plant Taxa and their microsymbionts 3. Ecological Factors Influencing Infective Frankia Populations 4.

Ecological of Actinorhizal Plants References 9. Molecular Biology of Actinorhizal Symbioses: L. Laplaze, S. Svistoonoff, C. Santi, F, Auguy, C. Franche and D. Typical Frankia infect actinorhizal plants exotic to New Zealand MICHAEL L. CLAWSON DAVID R. BENSON STEVEN C. RESCH Department of Molecular and Cell Biology U University of Connecticut Storrs, CTUSA DAVID W.

STEPHENS WARWICK B. SILVESTER Department of Biological Sciences The University of Waikato Private Bag Hamilton   Chapter The Root Hair: A Single Cell Model for Systems Biology. Marc Libault Chapter How Transcriptomics Revealed New Information on Actinorhizal Symbioses Establishment and Evolution.

Valerie Hocher. Chapter Molecular Biology of Infection and Nodule Development in Discaria trinervis – Frankia Actinorhizal Symbiosis. Sergio Format: NOOK Book (Ebook). Book chapter: Molecular biology of symbiotic nitrogen fixation. pp ref Abstract: The following topics are reviewed: (1) identification of symbiotic genes in Frankia frankia Subject Category: Organism NamesCited by:.

Actinorhizal Plants Actinorhizal plants are a group of angiosperms characterized by their ability to form a symbiosis with the nitrogen fixing actinobacteria Frankia. This association leads to the formation of nitrogen-fixing root nodules. 1.The diversity of the involved host plants poses a variety of challenges to the actinorhizal symbiosis and results in interesting strategies, for example, to cope with the O 2 dilemma or nutrient exchange between plant and bacterium.

The actinorhizal micro-symbionts are Gram-positive actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. The inability to culture.Nitrogen-fixing Actinobacteria of the genus Frankia can be subdivided into four phylogenetically distinct clades; members of clusters one to three engage in nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses with actinorhizal plants.

Mur enzymes are responsible for the biosynthesis of the peptidoglycan layer of bacteria. The four Mur ligases, MurC, MurD, MurE, and MurF, catalyse the addition of a short.